Conflict And Resolution: Peace-Building Through The Ballot Box In Zimbabwe, Namibia and Cambodia

Griffith, Allen (Allan Griffith, who had been Foreign Policy Adviser to Australian prime ministers or over 30 years, completed this book as visiting fellow of Oriel College, Oxford, shortly before his death in November 1998)
Published by: New Cherwell Press, Oxford, 1998
ISBN 10: 1900312158 /13: 978-1900312158

Reviewed by: Jannie Malan
In the African Journal on Conflict Resolution Volume 1 No. 1, 1999

The conjunction in the title of this book has not just been inserted as an attentioncatching novelty. The book is indeed about both conflict and resolution. In each of the three case studies it is not only the peace process that is described and discussed, but also the preceding conflict process. The serious cause and urgent purpose of each of the conflicts are taken into consideration. The actions and reactions of the involved people and leaders are related in a clear and well-documented way. The extended and complicated series of happenings are organised into insight-promoting units. The author makes very good use of his skills of selecting details and choosing descriptive as well as thought-prompting words. Enough detail is included to give the reader a penetrating sense of what happened. Apposite key words appear in chapter and section headings.

Perspectives of African Non-State Actors on the Work of the PSC

In line with Article 20 of the Protocol Relating to the Establishment of the Peace and Security Council (PSC) of the African Union (AU) the PSC has taken steps to ‘... encourage non-governmental organizations to participate actively in the efforts aimed at promoting peace, security and stability in Africa’. It is against this backdrop that the 50th Anniversary Solemn Declaration, the Tripoli Declaration, the Tripoli Plan of Action, the Maseru Conclusions and the Livingstone Formula are instructive.

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Integrating Traditional and Modern Conflict Resolution

Experiences from selected cases in Eastern and the Horn of Africa

Africa Dialogue Monograph Series No. 2/2012

Contemporary Africa is faced with the reality of numerous evolving states that have to grapple with the inevitability of conflict. On their own, the fledgling institutions in these states cannot cope with the huge demands unleashed by everyday conflict. It is within this context that the complementarity between traditional institutions and the modern state becomes not only observable but also imperative.

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Opportunity or Threat

The Engagement of Youth in African Societies

Africa Dialogue Monograph Series No. 1/2012

The greatest asset of any nation is its youth. The African Youth Charter defines a youth as a person between the ages of 15 and 35 years. In his address at the 17th Ordinary African Union Summit held in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea from 23 June– 1 July 2011, Dr Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director of UNFPA, stated that "... if youth make up 40% of the population, and people under the age of 35 make up over 65% of the entire population of the continent, then 65% of the continent's resources should be allocated to this age group".

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Playing for Peace

Following South Africa’s successful hosting of the 2010 Fifa World Cup, ACCORD's special edition magazine takes a unique look at how football is instrumental in bringing peace, unity and development in Africa.

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The question of youth participation in peacebuilding processes in Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria

By Timothy Aduojo Obaje and Nwabufo Okeke-Uzodike

The available body of literature addressing the roles of young people in armed conflict provides evidence of extensive child and youth involvement in warfare. For instance, Ukiwo (2003) draws attention to the role of young people as key actors in the escalation of violent conflicts in Nigeria’s Plateau State city of Jos, while other scholars emphasise the notorious use of violence by youths during Europe’s political crises and conflicts of the 1930s.

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Peace processes in Côte d’Ivoire

Democracy and challenges of consolidating peace after the post-electoral crisis

By Dr Doudou Sidibé

The attainment of full democracy remains elusive to even some of the greatest nations in the world. The West African country of Côte d’Ivoire, which experienced a violent post-electoral crisis (November 2010 to April 2011) within the midst of 19 years of political instability which started in 1993, also seeks to consolidate democratisation. The goal is not impossible to realise, but is dependent on the reconciliation of all stakeholders in the conflict and all sectors of society...

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Pride, conflict and complexity

Applying dynamical systems theory to understand local conflict in South Sudan

By Stephen Gray and Josefine Roos

South Sudan has experienced deadly conflict for much of the last five decades. While most attention has focused on South Sudan’s civil war with the now Republic of Sudan to the north, in reality, inter- related conflicts persist in multiple layers of society. Paradoxically, the termination of the war of nationhood activated ‘local conflicts’, which have led to the killing of thousands of people since peace was brokered with the north in 2005. This paper presents an assessment of a ‘typical local conflict’ between two Dinka clans, based on field research in Jonglei State, using a systemic approach to conflict assessment adapted from dynamical systems theory...

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Localising Peacebuilding in Sierra Leone

What Does it Mean?

By Dr Tony Karbo

Contemporary peacebuilding processes increasingly propose and adopt local ownership as a fundamental prerequisite in sustainable peacebuilding. Local ownership presupposes the application of an organic and context-specific approach to peacebuilding. Localisation also assumes the active participation of local actors, including national governments, civil society groups, community organisations and the private sector, in achieving a common purpose in peacebuilding processes.

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