From Warfare to Welfare: Human Security in a Southern African Context

Marie Muller and Bas De Gaay Fortman (eds.) 
Royal Van Gorcum, 2004, 188 pp.
ISBN-13: 90232 4043X

Undoubtedly, the question of security in Southern Africa will continue to be one of the main issues for discussion around regional cooperation among member states that belong to the Southern African Development Community (SADC). This is the case for a number of reasons. These include the fact that the sub-region does not seem to have been able to define in clear and concrete terms what approach it ought to take when it comes to its security.

From Soldiers to Citizens: Demilitarization of Conflict and Society

João Gomes Porto, Chris Alden and Imogen Parsons
Aldershot. Ashgate, 2007, 192 pp.
ISBN 978-0-7546-7210-4

Reviewed by Grace Maina, Acting Manager of the Knowledge Production Department at ACCORD
In the African Journal on Conflict Resolution Volume 10 No. 1, 2010

The focus of this book falls into the greater discussions of peace-building and post-conflict reconstruction. This book provides an in-depth analysis of the Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR) process and delves into an even deeper conversation about the concept and practice of Reintegration. The authors use empirical research on the Angolan DDR process to assess the merits and challenges of our understanding of the process of reintegration.

From Peacekeeping to Complex Emergencies: Peace Support Missions in Africa

alt Edited by Jakkie Cilliers and Greg Mills
Published by: SAIIA/ISS, Johannesburg, 1999
ISBN: 10: 1874890994 13: 978-1874890997

Reviewed by: Kwezi Mngqibisa, ACCORD
In Conflict Trends Issue 4 of 1999

The main thrust of this book is the pursuit of consensus around a standard African peacekeeping doctrine. In the first article, Cilliers and Mills do an excellent job in introducing the reader to the harsh realities that characterise conflicts and their resolution.

From Enslavement to Environmentalism: Politics on a Southern African Frontier

alt Hughes, David McDermott
Published by: Seattle and London: University of Washington Press in association with Weaver Press, Harare, 2006
ISBN: 10: 0295985909 13: 978-0295985909

Reviewed by Reviewed by Annie Derges, Senior Documentalist, SAPES Books
In the African Journal on Conflict Resolution Volume 7 No. 1, 2007

The politics of land dispossession and repossession in Zimbabwe are much in the news, and much written of, invariably in oversimplified terms. This eminently clear and readable account of the complexities of land disputes provides a different conceptualisation of territory and geography from an anthropological point of view. The author, on field expeditions to two small habitations in Zimbabwe and Mozambique, encountered vastly different concepts of territory and geography. How has it come about that a people, divided arbitrarily by a colonial border, view the landscape and the politics of land so differently?

For the Sake of Peace: Seven Paths to Global Harmony, a Buddhist Perspective

alt Daisaku Ikeda
Published by: Middleway, 2001. Santa Monica
ISBN: 10: 0967469724 13: 978-0967469720

Reviewed by: Motse Ramathe
In Conflict Trends Issue 4 of 2001

As a Buddhist leader, educator and philosopher, Daisaku Ikeda has written extensively on the sub- ject of world peace. In his latest book, For the sake of Peace, Daisaku Ikeda confirms the individual’s responsibility in bringing peace to the world. He argues that world peace can be achieved through self-control, dialogue and the creation of a culture of peace.

For Better or Worse? Women and ZANLA In Zimbabwe’s Liberation Struggle

alt

Josephine Nhongo-Simbanegavi
Published by: Harare, Weaver Press, 2000
ISBN: 10: 079742105X 13: 978-0797421059

Reviewed by Terence M. Mashingaidze, Lecturer, Midlands State University, Gweru, Zimbabwe
In the African Journal on Conflict Resolution Volume 3 No. 1, 2003

Traditional scholarship about Zimbabwe’s liberation struggle tended to be gender neutral and highly romanticised. The liberation fighters were presented as fair, brave and disciplined whilst the opposite applied to the forces of the colonial state. Recent historiography is now showing that all the protagonists in the war perpetrated injustices against the unarmed civilians and within their ranks. It is in this vein of challenging, reconstructing and deconstructing dominant notions and paradigms that Nhongo-Simbanegavi’s book, For Better or Worse? Women And ZANLA In Zimbabwe’s Liberation Struggle, emerges. The book deserves the commendation of all those interested in the history of African liberation movements. It is probably the most cogent refutation of the claims of the Zimbabwe African National Liberation Army (ZANLA) to the establishment of gender equity during the war of liberation. It shows the resilience of patriarchal hegemony in the various contexts that punctuated Zimbabwe’s history, such as the colonial and post-colonial periods, and the times of war and peace. The book is well researched and weaves a rich tapestry of women’s, mostly combatants’, experiences during the war and in the post-colonial dispensation. Besides oral interviews and data from secondary sources, the book relies heavily on the rich but largely inaccessible ZANLA archives at the Zimbabwe African National Union Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF) headquarters in Harare.

Entanglements: A Review of Suffering for Territory: Race, place and power in Zimbabwe

Donald S. Moore
Harare: Weaver Press, 2005, 399 pp.
ISBN: 978-0-8223-3582-5

 We must continue to struggle and not rest until the land is our own, the property of the people, of our grandfathers, taken from us by those who crush the land with their stone step... with the strength of our heart and our hand held high, we raise, to be seen by all, that beautiful banner of the dignity and freedom of we who work the land (Subcommandante Marcos, 2000).

Zimbabwe's history seethes with struggles about land, struggles that, although the country has been independent for over twenty-five years, remain unresolved. The Land Apportionment Act of 1930, and its successor, the Land Tenure Act of 1969, allocated fixed 'Reserves' for Africans dispossessed of their fertile lands by the settlers. These were located in areas of poor soils, characterised by difficulty of access and overcrowding. Their former lands became 'European Areas'. 'Purchase Areas' were available to a few (richer) African commercial farmers to buy.

Disarmament And Defence Industrial Adjustment In South Africa

alt By Peter Batchelor And Susan Willett
Published by: Oxford University Press, South Africa, (year unknown)
ISBN: 10: 0198294131 13: 978-0198294139

Reviewed in Conflict Trends Issue 1 of 1999

The South African defence industry, built up during the apartheid years and during the UN embargoes on sales of arms to South Africa, became one of the most important sectors of the country’s industrial base and a significant exporter. Since the end of aparteid, the end of the cold war and the elections of 1994, South Africa has cut its military expenditure drastically and is seeking to use the resources released to restructure and revitalise the country’s industrial base and to support reconstruction, development and redistribution. The new government has a unique opportunity to develop innovative policies on defence and security matters, the arms industry and arms exports. This analysis of the South African experience provides a valuable contribution to the international debate on the economic effects of military expenditure and defence industrialization and on the relationship between disarmament and development in developing countries.