Dangers of Splitting a Fragile Rentier State

Getting it Right in Southern Sudan - by Kenneth Omeje

Occasional Paper Series: Issue 1, 2010

The anticipated January 2011 independence referendum in Southern Sudan with its possibility of inaugurating a new state in Africa has engaged and excited local, regional and international attention in recent time. It is not surprising that most commentators and direct stakeholders have tended to focus more on the immediate mundane issues of whether or not the referendum should be held as scheduled; whether or not President Omar Bashir’s government is likely to honour the outcome of the referendum; who gets what in the post-referendum asset-sharing; and issues of boundary demarcation.

Being similar, different and coexistent

By Jannie Malan

Occasional Paper Series: Issue 3, 2011

Remarkably meaningful sayings that have emerged out of real life in Africa highlight our inherent interrelatedness as fellow human beings. In the life situations where we happen to find ourselves, there are similarities that bind us together, but also differences that tend to drive us apart. When a group of us becomes concerned about who we are, and who others are, such an 'identity' search may tempt us to think that our own group is better than other groups. Various pressures from our cultures, groups and personalities can create and strengthen feelings and habits of being against other groups. It is possible, however, to be liberated from such polarisation and to become turned towards others. The valid belongingness to one's own group can be retained and promoted, but dominating and discriminating own-groupishness should be rejected.

A Pocket of Stability

Understanding Somaliland - By Daniel R. Forti

Occasional Paper Series: Issue 2, 2011

This paper provides a comprehensive examination of Somaliland's unusual development and current standing as a self-declared sovereign nation. Unlike Somalia, a state devastated by a perpetual twenty-year conflict, Somaliland boasts a growing civil society along with a relatively vibrant democracy and accountability to the Rule of Law. Since 1991, the region has become a pocket of security and stability, in absence of formal recognition, by creating government and societal institutions that strongly suit the values and needs of its people.

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Conflict Trends 2015/3


On 15 September 2015, world leaders will gather in New York City for the 70th regular session of the UN General Assembly (UNGA70), and between 25 and 27 September 2015, world leaders will adopt the Post 2015 Development Agenda, following a review of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs are eight international development goals that were established following the Millennium Summit of the UN in 2000, and the adoption of the UN Millennium Declaration. All 189 UN member states and some 23 international organisations committed to help achieve the MDGs by 2015.

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Conflict Trends 2015/2

ACCORD Conflict Trends 2015/2

In 2015, the TfP Programme celebrates 20 years of partnership and cooperation with the AU, UN, RECs, RMs and African countries in building civilian and police capacity. In this Special Issue of Conflict Trends, we reflect on the programme’s impact and identify best practices and lessons that can help the programme – and others working in similar projects in Africa and beyond – learn from the TfP experience.

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Conflict Trends 2015/1

ACCORD Conflict Trends 2015/1

"Few could have predicted that the self-immolation of a Tunisian fruit vendor, Mohamed Bouazizi, on 17 December 2010, would become the spark to an unprecedented chain of events; an act responsible for recalibrating the dynamics of state and society in North Africa and beyond. The massive and far-reaching popular protests that followed this singular act spread across the North African countries of Egypt, Libya and Tunisia, while also affecting countries in the Middle East and Arabian Peninsula. These protests, which materialised from each country's respective indifference towards deep-seated socio-economic inequalities and political grievances, found expression, common purpose and momentum in the near-simultaneous actions and movement of millions of people across the region.....

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Conflict Trends 2014/4

ACCORD Conflict Trends 2014/3

"The year 2014 has been challenging for peace and security on the African continent. Asymmetric warfare and armed insurgency pervades northern Nigeria, northern Mali and the Kenya-Somalia border region. Failure to swiftly resolve South Sudan’s internal armed conflict, approaching a full year in December, has sent destabilising reverberations throughout the Horn of Africa. The continued breakdown of civic, political and economic institutions in the Central African Republic and Libya heightens the potential for long-term social fragmentation in these resource-rich countries. The Ebola outbreak, which has now killed over 5600 people and cost millions of dollars in lost gross domestic product (GDP), threatens to unravel decades of progress in peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction across West Africa....

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Conflict Trends 2014/3

ACCORD Conflict Trends 2014/3

"The abduction of over 250 young schoolgirls from Chibok, Borno State in Nigeria this past April, and the killing of Yazidi men and the abduction of their women and children in August this year, sent shockwaves throughout the world. Viewed in isolation, these reprehensible acts stand out for their symbolism and magnitude, as well as for the swift and universal condemnation towards previously barely known groups, such as Boko Haram and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Viewed within the context of current conflict dynamics throughout Africa, the Middle East and south-west Asia, however, the Chibok abductions and Yazidi killings and kidnappings constitute perhaps the most glaring evidence that we are once again transitioning to asymmetrical conflict and warfare....

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