Issue No: 20/2020

COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor – 2 September 2020

Special issue on COVID-19 and the youth

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ACCORD COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor
References: AfricaCDC, ACLED and African Arguments

This week’s Monitor is a special edition on COVID-19 and the youth, and emphasises the necessity for all responders to heed the UN’s call of ‘Building Back Better’. It features an article by Graeme Simpson – lead author of The Missing Peace: Independent Progress Study on Youth, Peace and Security – and Ali Altiok. Among other things, they reflect on the generational and gendered manifestations of the measures adopted by governments, and societal responses, to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Kobla Asamani shares perspectives and reflections from the more than 50 Inter-Generational Dialogues (IGDs) that ACCORD has held across the globe. Through these IGDs, young people have had an opportunity to make a case for their inclusion in key decision-making processes that impact on their lives, and have been able to express their views – including that unless urgent action is taken, the youth are likely to suffer severe and lasting impacts from the pandemic.

The importance of gathering and sustaining trust between public institutions and citizens – especially the youth – during this global pandemic features in an article by Dr Rhuks Ako. Lastly, Sibu Nkosi calls for the need to build partnerships on the basis of the various positive efforts, innovations and resilience shown by youth-led and youth-focused organisations in contributing to efforts towards responding to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Managing Editor: COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor
Chief Editor: COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor​
Photo: Freepik Premium
Photo: Freepik Premium

The COVID-19 pandemic – as well as governmental and societal responses to it – feed into, feed off and trigger pre-existing local, national and global patterns of inequality and exclusion. Unsurprisingly, these responses have also had generational and gendered manifestations. The profile of the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact provides a powerful mirror image of the interconnected structural ‘violence of exclusion’ that young women and men described so powerfully through The Missing Peace: Independent Progress Study on Youth, Peace and Security.

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Photo: Gallo Images/Dino Lloyd
Photo: Gallo Images/Dino Lloyd

Even before the onset of COVID-19, the social and economic integration of young people was an ongoing challenge. The pandemic has been particularly hard on young women, children and youth from middle- and lower-income countries. Of the many impacts associated with the pandemic, young people face challenges linked to education, health, food and shelter. In spite of this, young people remain determined to collaborate safely and effectively with governments, civil society and other institutions to ‘Build Back Better’.

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Photo: AFP Photo/Mosaab El-Shamy
Photo: AFP Photo/Mosaab El-Shamy
Rhuks Ako
Trust between Citizens & Institutions

COVID-19: reinforcing (dis)trust between youth and institutions in Africa

  • Rhuks Ako

The entry into and rapid spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in Africa has raised several significant questions pertaining to the capacity of governments to respond effectively and, more importantly, to gain citizens’ – especially youths’ – trust in a period of global crisis. The management of COVID-19 by some African governments has offered a veritable opportunity to garner public trust and at least improve (if not completely change) public perceptions, especially with regard to accountability and transparency.

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Photo: RFStudio
Photo: RFStudio
Sibusisiwe Nkosi
Trust between Citizens & Institutions

Youth as crucial assets for COVID-19 recovery

  • Sibusisiwe Nkosi

The success of efforts to curb the spread of COVID-19 will depend partly on forging and strengthening partnerships with young people in Africa. Across the continent, youth-led and youth-focused organisations have continued to show resilience and innovation in contributing to solutions to respond to the challenges that have emerged due to COVID-19.

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ACCORD recognizes its longstanding partnerships with the European Union, and the Governments of Canada, Finland, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, UK, and USA.

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