© European Union 2017 - European Parliament

Issue No: 7/2021

COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor – 24 March 2021

During the COVID-19 crisis ACCORD's analysis will be focused on the impact of the pandemic on conflict and resilience in Africa.

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ACCORD COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor
References: AfricaCDC, ACLED and African Arguments

This week’s edition of the Monitor provides perspectives on climate change and peace and security through the lens of European Union-Africa relations. It features Professor Carlos Lopes, the African Union High Representative for Partnerships with Europe and former Executive Secretary of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. In his piece, Prof Lopes discusses the value of common but differentiated responsibilities on climate change as the guiding principle behind AU-EU climate change related relations.

Volker Hauck and Lidet Tadesse Shiferaw of the European Centre for Development Policy Management reflect on EU-Africa relations and specifically unpack the longstanding relations between the two on issues of peace and security. 

ACCORD’s Cedric de Coning argues that 2021 is a critical year for UNMISS. He analyses the priorities of the UN mission’s new mandate, which was approved on 12 March 2021.

Lastly, Dr Andrew E. Yaw Tchie from the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI) and Kheira Tarif from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (PRIO) summarise the research on the impact of climate change on the peace and security situation in South Sudan.

Special Guest Editor
Managing Editor: COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor
Managing Editor: COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor
Chief Editor: COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor​
SEYLLOU DIALLO/AFP via Getty Images
SEYLLOU DIALLO/AFP via Getty Images
Carlos Lopes
Features, Livelihood Insecurity & Economic Impact

Common but Different: Africa and Europe’s climate responsibilities

  • Carlos Lopes

When it comes to climate change, Africa and Europe have one thing in common: countries in both regions are either signatories or parties to the Paris Agreement, which entered into force in 2016. This is not a trivial matter. It means that the 2017 Abidjan AU-EU Summit climate ambitions were based on a firm and approved framework. The EU, Africa’s main trading partner, has demonstrated its ambition to lead the climate transition with its European Green Deal. Africans should commend these policy goals and emulate them as much as possible, while at the same time warning their Northern partners about the possible negative impact of several Green Deal related EU legislations on the continent.

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Paul Kagame Flickr
Paul Kagame Flickr
Trust between Citizens & Institutions

Continuity and Change in European Union-Africa Relations on Peace and Security

  • Volker Hauck
  • Lidet Tadesse Shiferaw

The European Union (EU) and the African Union (AU) maintain a long-standing partnership on peace and security which can be qualified as constructive. It is largely based on joint interests and objectives and is less contentious compared to other more challenging topics, such as migration and trade. The EU’s new seven-year budget for 2021 – 2027 introduces new ways of working which impact on how the EU will engage on peace and security in Africa. Most notable in this regard is the establishment of the European Peace Facility (EPF) which can potentially undermine the AU’s role in leading and coordinating peace and security measures on the continent. Moreover, these new developments take place against the backdrop of an overall troubled EU-AU relationship which suffers not only from the divergences in interests in key areas such as migration, trade and climate but also from the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, and global geopolitics.

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ACCORD COVID-19 Conflict & Resilience Monitor
References: Data Provider ACLED / Analysis & Visualisation j Luengo-Cabrera
Cedric de Coning
Political Unrest or Violence

A critical year ahead for the UN Mission in South Sudan

  • Cedric de Coning

South Sudan is the world’s youngest nation and one of the least populated countries in Africa, but also one of the most vulnerable to climate change. The consequences of climate change can worsen South Sudan’s humanitarian crises and fragile security environment, marked by widespread communal conflict and a civil war since 2013. With a population estimated at 11 million, more than 1.6 million people have been internally displaced due to prolonged conflict.

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UN Photo: Isaac Billy
UN Photo: Isaac Billy
Livelihood Insecurity & Economic Impact

Climate, Peace and Security: The case of South Sudan

  • Andrew E. Yaw Tchie
  • Kheira Tarif

South Sudan is the world’s youngest nation and one of the least populated countries in Africa, but also one of the most vulnerable to climate change. The consequences of climate change can worsen South Sudan’s humanitarian crises and fragile security environment, marked by widespread communal conflict and a civil war since 2013. With a population estimated at 11 million, more than 1.6 million people have been internally displaced due to prolonged conflict. 

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ACCORD recognizes its longstanding partnerships with the European Union, and the Governments of Canada, Finland, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, UK, and USA.

ACCORD recognizes its longstanding partnerships with the European Union, and the Governments of Canada, Finland, Ireland, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, UK, and USA.

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